Human Behavior in the Social Environment (SWK 5223)

A course at the University of Oklahoma Anne and Henry Zarrow School of Social Work taught by Carrie Jankowski, MSSW, LCSW

Month: November 2016 (Page 1 of 3)

BP10

Give one example of your own thinking at one or more points in your life that reflect the following:

dualism

multiplicity

relativism

According to Broderick (2015) of my own thinking that reflected a dualism when I was nine and listening to what my parents told me about my culture, womanhood, customs and tradition without forming my own concept or idea of my own. My life reflected towards multiplicity when I moved out of my parents home and exploring adulthood and having to negative through adulthood with uncertainty on how to navigate through adulthood, I was forced to make life decisions that affected me as an individual and as adult, such as finical burdens, independence, education, personal relationship etc.. Relativism came through my late 20’s when I’ve found my own identity of who am, such my values, culture, and religious beliefs.

What are two marker events that could help a young adult to develop into their current level of thinking?

The two marker that can help a young adult to develop their own current level of thinking will first to have a good support system from their family, friends, and peers they can go to for support when life gets difficult. The second marker would for young adult something they can look up as a role model that would help them set a positive influence in their life.

BP 10

One example in my own thinking of multiplicity was when I was younger, before college, I believed that there is a God and that the people that did not believe in a God or believed in a God other than the God I believed in was wrong.

An example of multiplicity in my own thinking occurred when I first learned about the big bang theory. I learned the scientific theory that the universe was developed by a big bang. Before that, I had been told that God created the earth and the universe. This conflicted with what I believed in.

An example in my own thinking that reflected relativism occurred while talking to a friend about politics. My friend, who associated with the opposite party I associate with, was trying to make his case about police violence and african americans. We clearly had differing opinions but i was able to respect his opinion, while still believing what I believed was right.

In the text Broderick(2015) states that when young adults begin to lose their protection and are faced with taking responsibility for their own decisions it helps develop their thinking.

Broderick (2015) states that another marker of events that may help young adults develop into their current levels of thinking is higher education.

BP 10

I experienced dualism when I was younger.  My grandmother went to the bank and received  more money than she requested. She then went back to the bank and returned the money to the teller.  According to (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015)    Dualism is a position of knowing right versus wrong. 

With multiplicity, I experienced my mother argue with he left siblings over personal issues and matters. They often would fight and not come to terms with a valid solution. (Biroderick & Blewitt, 2015) , stated that in a multiplicity stage that there maybe multiple view points that all have validity. 

As I begin to converse with my cousins (my peers) we all had a mutual respect for the thoughts of each other. I guess it was because of our experience of our mothers.  Broderick & Blewitt, 2015) 

BP 10 Young Adulthood

 

 

 

When I began college I was very much a rule follower and was in the strict Dualism mode that Perry (1970/1990) discusses.  There was a clear right and wrong.  I obeyed my parents and even more so my grandparents.  I set up a very structured schedule for myself and moved forward.  Then Multiplicity came.

Multiplicity was a theme for me the entire time in college.  As the book discussed in early multiplicity that a person realizes that life is not fair and that you may do everything that you should and a person may still not get the result they wanted.  This happened to me time and again in college to a point where I thought I was just not cut out to go to college.  It seemed that every time I turned around there was a barrier.  These barriers consisted of taking the classes my advisor told me to only to find out that they were the wrong classes.  At one point in my college career I had to change colleges just to get the classes I needed int hat semester due to going to class the first day and 3 of them were cancelled due to lack of instructor.  During this two years I questioned everything I was doing.  I reevaluated the “just world” (learner, 1980) I was living in and came close to giving up.  However, I did not.  I persevered and received my degree and am certainly better off for it.

By the end of my college years I had been in several social service positions and learned a lot about how the systems work and could distinguish between competent case workers and non competent.   I could relate my experiences and knowledge and felt like I had reached what the book refers to as Contextual Relativism.

Markers that assist in making and shaping someones philosophy of thinking can include big life events where the individual has either a negative or positive repression to the event.  Talking with people that they have close relationships with

 

 

 

 

BP 10

Dualism……strict authoritative discipline of my mother when I wanted to stay out late with my friends when my mother felt like I was not old enough or had the maturity to hang out as if I was older.

multiplicity…..as I reflect on my own experience with multiplicity, I can remember being confused about whether to actually kiss a boy I was interested in. During this confusion, I wrestled with romantic emotions versus whether it was the right thing to do. My mom at the time, which I did not tell her how I felt because I was afraid, talked to me about relationships and intimacy. She explained that I was too young to have control of my emotions in dealing with sex or anything leading up to that and explained that she didn’t have anyone to explain to her and became a mom, the same age I was at that time…..14. I listened and accepted her advice and authority.

relativism…..I valued my moms opinions with later maturity….I was able to make more decisions on my own with little authority from my single mom such as what I wanted to maybe study in college that best fit my personality and what I felt strongly about with more encouragement than authoritative parenting.

Two marker events that could help a young adult into their current level of thinking in my opinion would be dualism and multiplicity because I believe they are the core processes that shape a growing young adult to the level of “relativism”.

The life span: human development for helping professionals, Chapter 11/ Patricia C. Broderick, Pamela Blewett.

BP 10

Give one example of your own thinking at one or more points in your life that reflect the following:

dualism

multiplicity

relativism

 

What are two marker events that could help a young adult to develop into their current level of thinking?

One example of my own thinking that reflected dualism is my belief that whatever my mother said was correct and I had to follow her guide and not question my own belief. This is something that I experienced in my early adult years and utilized my mother as guide in my own knowledge, especially during my late high school years. Broderick and Blewitt (2015) explains that dualism is when individuals never think to question their belief that authority embodies rightness. An example of multiplicity in my own life is when I entered college and had to take in different perspectives from different people from various backgrounds to understand their position on certain topics. Multiplicity is when someone is exposed to a mass of theories, social experiences, and information (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015). An example of relativism in my own life is towards the end of my undergraduate educational experience as I was confronted with information from different people and formed my own opinion regarding different topics as I understood that not every position was a correct position. However, I could perceive everyone’s opinion on a topic objectively. Relativism is a major achievement in intellectual development where young adults can stand back and consider different perspectives objectively (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015). Two marker events that can help young adults develop into their own thinking is when they separate from their parents and get their own place like going to college or simply just moving away as this will help them move from dualism into multiplicity. Another event that can transition a young adult is going into the workforce or going into a new environment with different people that they are not familiar with as this can help them move from multiplicity to relativism.

Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). Physical and Cognitive Development in Young Adulthood. The Life Span: Human Development for Helping Professionals (4th ed., pp 422-423). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

 

 

BP 10

Give one example of your own thinking at one or more points in your life that reflect the following: dualism, multiplicity,relativism

What are two marker events that could help a young adult to develop into their current level of thinking?

Dualism can best describe my thinking at a very young age when the majority of my  views were influenced by my parents’ views.  Their views were essentially my views and everyone else was wrong. The different stages of multiplicity can be seen as I grew older and had more exposure to classmates and their views.  Over time I would learn others had views which were not the same has mine but did not mean they were necessarily wrong. Finally, relativism is seen later in life by understanding and respecting others view points while looking at them more objectively and using other people’s differing viewpoints to help redefine my own.

Two marker events which could help a young adult develop their current level of thinking would be moving to a different environment for instance someone who grew up in a small town could move to a city or vice versa to better understand other people’s ways of living by more of less immersing themselves in another lifestyle. This idea could be applied for a young adult attending college in a different state or studying abroad.

Broderick, P.C.. & Blewitt, P. (2014). The life span: Human development for helping professionals (4th ed. ) HarlowL Pearson Education

BP10

An example of dualism in my life would be my unquestioning adherence to the idea that I had to do well in school. Regardless of how others performed, my success was expected. It was probably not until high school that I reached a level of multiplicity that allowed me to realize that not everyone held the same expectations for themselves. Sadly, relativism did not fully take shape until my 20s! It was then that I was able to understand that, though others may hold different beliefs, neither their beliefs or mine were “better.” For example, while working at the Social Security office a couple of years ago, I was exposed to fa culture that, before, I had only been able to form an opinion of through stereotypes and the experience of others. However, through this exposure, I was able to form my own, more informed understanding.

The first “marker event” that I could think of that could have a significant impact on young people as they move into the multiplicity stages is their first significant relationship. While there are certainly different ways to engage in relationships, there is hardly a “correct way,” and teens will be bombarded with various teachings claiming to be the best way, but will soon learn that it is something they will have to figure out for themselves. The second event would be the transition from high school to college, where they will face many situations that will make them question the “correctness” of their own belief systems. While they may have similar encounters during their teen years, college will expose them to a far wider variation of opinions and belief systems.

BP10

Give one example of your own thinking at one or more points in your life that reflect the following: dualism, multiplicity, relativism

What are two marker events that could help a young adult to develop into their current level of thinking?

When I entered college, I learned that ideas or beliefs my parents taught me were not necessarily the only or correct way of thinking. For example, when I came to college, I had to be more responsible and learn to cope with and do things on my own. I knew that it was wrong to stay up late partying when I had an 8 a.m. class the next day. but without my parents there to constantly tell me right versus wrong I had to decide for myself and suffer the consequences for my actions. I had to be responsible for myself, which was difficult without the immediate (face to face) support from my family. This is an example of dualism.

College also taught me that not everyone has the same thoughts or opinions on certain subjects. My view of one subject may be completely different from someone else view. I had to really think for myself and make my own judgments on whether what my professor was explaining to me was right, especially if it was different from what my parents or previous school (elementary, junior high, high school) had taught me. Ultimately, what was instilled in me from family was what I deemed to be correct until I was able to research for myself. This is an example of multiplicity.

When I arrived at the relativism stage of development, I was able to have more in-depth conversations with my parents and families on particular topics and found that our views and ideas were perhaps somewhat different. This happened during college, but mostly after college. I was able to engage more with my parents and realized we felt the same on some issues and different on others

The text suggest many marker events. Two in particular that could help a young adult transition into their current level of thinking include leaving the family home, which I did when coming to college and was able to open my mind more to views of others and the world in general; and completing formal education, which taught me that my family’s views and thoughts were not the only correct or viewed the same in the world. It allowed me to have an open mind and engage and learn from others, helping me to develop into the person I am today.

Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The Emerging Self and Socialization in the Early Years. The Life Span: Human Development for Helping Professionals (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

BP10

 

Growing up in an authoritarian household, there was no questioning if the the authorities were truthful or not. I remember my teen years being very black and white. Parents and teachers knew the correct path, I listened to them and followed direction. There was definitely an in group and out group that was developed during my teenage years. Parental influence indicated what the in group was (me, my family, teachers, and certain peers) and who the out group was (“bad” peers and people in the neighborhood) (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015). I would say that multiplicity occurred later for me, mostly when I entered into the college lifestyle. It was at this point I began to see that there are different perspectives and these perspectives were not incorrect, such as religion and various philosophies. I still looked towards professors for clarification and guidance, but was more comfortable making most decisions. According to the authors, it is not uncommon for people in this stage to need assistance from authority figures.

It wasn’t until grad school (the first time) that I began to really take a more relativism stance with position 5 (contextual relativism). Previously I was aware of other perspective and new that they weren’t necessarily incorrect, I just felt my way of thinking was more justified because my thoughts were supported. During grad school, there was more discussion and facts to support various opinions. When there were reasons as to why a person developed these opinions, I became more respectful. It is when the person cannot provide valid facts to support their statements that I begin to question if their opinion is legitimate.

I would think that two events that could help young adults develop into their current level of thinking are when they develop independence from familiar surroundings and moving away from perpetual authorities.   Also, as a person begins to form romantic attachments away from the home, they become exposed to valid points of view that causes situations where the person has to reevaluate their beliefs and opinions through new exposures.

Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The life span: Human development for helping professionals. Harlow: Pearson Education.

 

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